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Dr. Elias Tsakos at the conference “Pandemic COVID-19 threat or opportunity?”

The medical director of Embryoclinic Dr. Elias Tsakos participates in the conference on “Pandemic COVID-19 threat or opportunity?”, held in Thessaloniki (September 17-19, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki), with an extremely interesting speech:

👉 Greece as a global destination for FERTILITY medical tourism in the era of COVID-19
📌 Saturday 18/09 & time 17.10-18.34, KEDEA AUTh Building – Amphitheater I

➡ Get the full program of the conference here: https://websites.auth.gr/pandemicconference/schedule/

FREE webinar: Patients with recurrent miscarriages – Success Stories


Are you struggling with miscarriages?
Join us TOMORROW for this FREE webinar with Dr Elias Tsakos MD, FRCOG, Medical Director of EmbryoClinic who will be talking about patients’ success stories after recurrent miscarriages.

We will be LIVE TOMORROW (Tuesday, September 14th, 2021) at 7 PM (UK time), hosted by #myIVFanswers.
Register here: https://www.embryoclinic.eu/webinars/

 

 

Did you miss it? You can watch the webinar here:

Everyday chemicals contribute to air pollution mortality

  • Air pollution is responsible for the deaths of around 7 million people each year — and 91% of the global population is exposed to air that exceeds the limits on pollution levels set by the World Health Organization (WHO).
  • Fine particulate matter is a key source of air pollution. This can be directly produced or indirectly produced when other pollutants react to chemicals in the atmosphere.
  • In a new study, researchers highlight another type of pollutant, called anthropogenic secondary organic aerosols (ASOAs), which also react with other pollutants.
  • The researchers show that ASOAs are likely to significantly contribute to mortality associated with air pollution.

In a new study, a team of scientists has shown that an under-researched type of pollution, ASOAs, make a significant contribution to air pollution mortality.

For the researchers, their findings, published in the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, highlight the need for greater focus on these types of aerosols and the need for further research into how, when, and where they react with other pollutants to cause air pollution.

Fine particulate matter

According to the WHO, about 7 million people die each year due to air pollution. The organization also reports that over 90% of the world’s population breathes air that exceeds the WHO’s safety standards for air pollution.

Researchers have found that fine particulate matter is a leading cause of this pollution — and that deaths due to fine particulate matter have increased from 3.5 million per year in 1990 to 4.2 million per year in 2015.

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, fine particulate matter can be caused directly or indirectly. Some direct sources of fine particulate matter include fires and construction sites.

Indirect sources include chemicals such as nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide, which can be emitted from the burning of fossil fuels and react with other chemicals in the atmosphere to produce fine particulate matter.

Strong correlation

The researchers found a strong correlation between the production of ASOAs and volatile organic compounds, which react in the atmosphere to create fine particulate matter.
Using the models, the researchers estimate that ASOAs cause between 340,000 and 900,000 premature deaths each year. According to Dr. Nault, “[That is] more than [10] times as many deaths as previously estimated.”

While regulations on air pollution emission have increased over time, ASOAs have seen relatively little regulation.

Source www.medicalnewstoday.com

FREE webinar: IVF legislation in Greece

Are you considering IVF in Greece?
Join the IVFWEBINAR with Dr Elias Tsakos, FRCOG, Medical Director of EmbryoClinic and learn all aspects of IVF legislation in Greece.

We will be LIVE TOMORROW (Wednesday, June30th, 2021) at 7 PM (UK time), hosted by #myIVFanswers.
Register here https://www.embryoclinic.eu/webinars/

 

 

Did you miss it? You can watch the webinar here:

Embryoclinic at the 6th Panhellenic Conference on Fertility and Infertility

We are very pleased to welcome the resumption of medical conferences with a physical presence!
An optimistic message for the restoration of our daily life as we knew it and of our personal and scientific socialization!

We actively participate in the 6th Panhellenic Conference on Fertility and Infertility with a speaker, the medical director of Embryoclinic, obstetrician gynecologist, FRCOG Mr. Elias Tsako and we wish all participants and the organizing committee good luck and a good start!

Human health ‘intricately linked’ to ocean health

In the paper, which appears in the American Journal of Public Health, the authors say that restoring the health of oceans should not just be the priority of marine scientists but also the medical community and the public more broadly.

Ocean health

The ocean covers 71% of the Earth’s surface and is crucial not only for environmental health but also for the health of humans.

However, human actions have significantly damaged the health of the world’s ocean. The issues that it currently faces include:

  • marine pollution
  • ocean acidification
  • overfishing
  • rises in sea level

According to the researchers behind the present article, as well as damaging the health of the world’s ocean, these issues also negatively impact human health.

Human health

The researchers highlight that around the world, swimming in polluted seas is linked with over 250 million cases of respiratory illness and gastroenteritis each year.

Furthermore, Arctic indigenous peoples have become exposed to a build-up of organic pollutants. Coastal communities are exposed to indirect damage to their health when fish stocks collapse, restricting access to food and severely reducing livelihoods.

The researchers argue that responding to this damage to ocean health will also improve people’s health. However, oceans can also promote human health in their own right.

The scientists point out that seafood provides a key source of omega-3 fatty acids, while extracts from marine organisms can play a role in medical treatments. Additionally, “blue spaces” — locations near water — also have links with improvements in people’s physical and mental health.

Source www.medicalnewstoday.com

Top tips for successful IVF Treatment

 

Are you looking for ways to increase chances of a successful treatment?

 

Tip #1 Educate

It’s a reality that as we grow up, we are often taught how not to get pregnant! So, the first tip is to learn as much as you can about your body, reproduction, and the basics of IVF.

When you start treatment, there are also a lot of acronyms and it can almost seem like you are speaking in a foreign language. But as you read articles or watch videos and webinars, you will learn about this new language. Soon, the words IVF, ICSI, PGT-a and blastocyst culture will not seem so foreign to you!

It’s also useful to identify what treatment options are more adequate to your individual circumstances. Whether you may consider having treatment with your own eggs, with donor eggs or surrogacy for example.

There is a lot of information online, and it’s not always reliable. Remember to choose trustworthy sources of information, like HFEA, ESHRE, BFS or ASRM. Joining patient support groups can also be a good way of learning about fertility and treatment.

 

Tip #2 Prepare

Ahead of the initial consultation, there are a few things you can do to prepare for it, and make sure you are taking as much as you can of that moment with the clinicians. You can start by collecting all relevant medical files about your and your partner’s health, medical and surgical history, sexual and menstrual health etc.

If you are monitoring ovulation or have done any basic fertility tests like AMH testing, pelvic ultrasound scan, tubal assessment or semen analysis, remember to bring these to the examination. The more information you have about yourself and your history of trying to conceive, the better the clinicians will be able to help you.

 

Tip #3 Optimize

Optimizing your chances of success with treatment is also about making sure your body, mind and soul are ready for what’s come. You can improve your nutrition, to make sure your body is getting the nutrients it needs to thrive, practice moderate exercise, seek fertility coaching, psychological support etc. It’s also important to take essential vitamins supplements, like folic acid and vitamin D.

 

Tip #4 Explore & Decide

Take your time to explore and decide on the options that are available to you. Reflect on the type of treatment that might be more suitable, for example IUI, IVF, ICSI, egg or sperm donation, surrogacy.

Consider the location where you’d like to have treatment. Different countries have different regulations that may be more fertility friendly to the treatment you need. You may want to have local NHS treatment, or local private treatment, or you may prefer to go a bit further way nationally or even have treatment abroad. To help you explore and decide, you may be able to visit clinics either physically or digitally. You may also be able to have online consultations.

 

Tip #5 Trust

Finally, once you have made your decision, trust the chosen clinic and the team. They are there to support you and guide you in your treatment. Mutual trust is essential for a great experience and for safety and success!

In cooperation with Enhanced Fertility Programme