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Water is important!

Fifteen benefits of drinking water

  1. It lubricates the joints
  2. It forms saliva and mucus
  3. It delivers oxygen throughout the body
  4. It boosts skin health and beauty
  5. It cushions the brain, spinal cord, and other sensitive tissues
  6. It regulates body temperature
  7. The digestive system depends on it
  8. It flushes body waste
  9. It helps maintain blood pressure
  10. The airways need it
  11. It makes minerals and nutrients accessible
  12. It prevents kidney damage
  13. It boosts performance during exercise
  14. Weight loss
  15. It reduces the chance of a hangover

Tips to reduce water waste

  1. Turn off the tap while washing your face, brushing your teeth and shaving
  2. Fix leaks
  3. Avoid mid-day plant and lawn watering
  4. Shorten your showers
  5. Only run your washing machine and dishwasher when full

Sources: www.medicalnewstoday.com
greenactioncentre.ca

How to Prepare Your Older Children for a New Baby

A new baby brings joys and challenges to a family. You’re excited, but you may also be nervous about how your older children will react to the newborn.

All sorts of questions come up: How should we tell our older children that they are going to have a baby brother or sister? Will they be jealous of the new baby? How can we help them get along?

Children of different ages will react differently to a new baby.

Knowing what to expect from each age group will make it easier to handle the changes in your family.

Toddlers – Ages 1 To 2 Years

Children of this age will not understand much about what it means to have a new brother or sister. However, let your child hear you talk about the “new baby” and feel your excitement. She may not understand why you are excited, but your attitude will rub off on her and she will feel excited too.

Keep in mind, you may not be able to satisfy the needs of both children all the time—especially not by yourself. If you feel overwhelmed, look to your partner, other relatives, and friends for support and an extra set of arms.

  • Look at picture books about a new baby. At the very least, your child will become familiar with words like “sister,” “brother,” and “new baby”.
  • When the new baby arrives, try to do something special for your older child. Reassure her that she is still loved. Some ideas include giving her a special gift, letting her spend some time alone with dad, grandma, or another special adult, or taking her someplace special.

Preschoolers – Ages 2 To 4 Years

At this age, your child is still very attached to you and does not yet understand how to share you with others. Your child also may be very sensitive to change and may feel threatened by the idea of a new family member. Here are some suggestions that may help ease your preschooler into being a big brother or big sister.

  • Wait a while before telling your preschooler about the baby. Explain it to your child when you start buying nursery furniture or baby clothes or if he starts asking about mom’s growing “stomach.” Picture books for preschoolers can be very helpful. So can sibling classes (ask your hospital if it offers them). Try to tell your child before he hears about the new baby from someone else.
  • Be honest. Explain that the baby will be cute and cuddly but will also cry and take a lot of your time and attention. Also, make sure that your older child knows that it may be a while before he can play with the new baby. Reassure your child that you will love him just as much after the baby is born as you do now.
  • Involve your preschooler in planning for the baby. This will make him less jealous. Let him shop with you for baby items. Show him his own baby pictures. If you are going to use some of his old baby things, let him play with them a bit before you get them ready for the new baby. Buy your child (boy or girl) a doll so he can take care of “his” baby.
  • Time major changes in your child’s routine. If you can, finish toilet training or switching from a crib to a bed before the baby arrives. If that is not possible, put them off until after the baby is settled in at home. Otherwise, your child may feel overwhelmed by trying to learn new things on top of all the changes caused by the new baby.
  • Expect your child to regress a little. For example, your toilet-trained child might suddenly start having “accidents,” or he might want to take a bottle. This is normal and is your older child’s way of making sure he still has your love and attention. Instead of telling him to act his age, let him have the attention he needs. Praise him when he acts more grown-up.
  • Prepare your child for when you are in the hospital. He may be confused when you leave for the hospital. Explain that you will be back with the new baby in a few days.
  • Set aside special time for your older child. Read, play games, listen to music, or simply talk together. Show him that you love him and want to do things with him. Also, make him feel a part of things by having him cuddle next to you when you feed the baby.
  • Ask family and friends to spend a little time with your older child when they come to see the new baby. This will help him feel special and not left out of all the excitement. They might also give him a small gift when they bring gifts for the baby.
  • Have your older child spend time with dad. A new baby presents a great opportunity for fathers to spend time alone with older children.

School-Aged Children – Ages 5 and above

Children older than 5 years are usually not as threatened by a new baby as younger children are. However, they may resent the attention the new baby gets. To prepare your school-aged child for a new baby,

  • Tell your child what is happening in language she can understand. Explain what having a new baby means and what changes may affect her—both the good and the not so good.
  • Have your older child help get things ready for the new baby by fixing up the baby’s room, picking out clothes, or buying diapers.
  • If possible, have your older child come to the hospital soon after the baby is born so she feels part of the growing family.
  • When you bring the new baby home, make your older child feel that she has a role to play in caring for the baby. Tell her she can hold the baby, although she must ask you first. Praise her when she is gentle and loving toward the baby.
  • Do not overlook your older child’s needs and activities. Let her know how much you love her. Make an effort to spend some time alone with her each day; use that as a chance to remind her how special she is.

Source www.healthychildren.org

Dr. Elias Tsakos at the conference “Pandemic COVID-19 threat or opportunity?”

The medical director of Embryoclinic Dr. Elias Tsakos participates in the conference on “Pandemic COVID-19 threat or opportunity?”, held in Thessaloniki (September 17-19, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki), with an extremely interesting speech:

👉 Greece as a global destination for FERTILITY medical tourism in the era of COVID-19
📌 Saturday 18/09 & time 17.10-18.34, KEDEA AUTh Building – Amphitheater I

➡ Get the full program of the conference here: https://websites.auth.gr/pandemicconference/schedule/

FREE webinar: Patients with recurrent miscarriages – Success Stories


Are you struggling with miscarriages?
Join us TOMORROW for this FREE webinar with Dr Elias Tsakos MD, FRCOG, Medical Director of EmbryoClinic who will be talking about patients’ success stories after recurrent miscarriages.

We will be LIVE TOMORROW (Tuesday, September 14th, 2021) at 7 PM (UK time), hosted by #myIVFanswers.
Register here: https://www.embryoclinic.eu/webinars/

 

 

Did you miss it? You can watch the webinar here:

Everyday chemicals contribute to air pollution mortality

  • Air pollution is responsible for the deaths of around 7 million people each year — and 91% of the global population is exposed to air that exceeds the limits on pollution levels set by the World Health Organization (WHO).
  • Fine particulate matter is a key source of air pollution. This can be directly produced or indirectly produced when other pollutants react to chemicals in the atmosphere.
  • In a new study, researchers highlight another type of pollutant, called anthropogenic secondary organic aerosols (ASOAs), which also react with other pollutants.
  • The researchers show that ASOAs are likely to significantly contribute to mortality associated with air pollution.

In a new study, a team of scientists has shown that an under-researched type of pollution, ASOAs, make a significant contribution to air pollution mortality.

For the researchers, their findings, published in the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, highlight the need for greater focus on these types of aerosols and the need for further research into how, when, and where they react with other pollutants to cause air pollution.

Fine particulate matter

According to the WHO, about 7 million people die each year due to air pollution. The organization also reports that over 90% of the world’s population breathes air that exceeds the WHO’s safety standards for air pollution.

Researchers have found that fine particulate matter is a leading cause of this pollution — and that deaths due to fine particulate matter have increased from 3.5 million per year in 1990 to 4.2 million per year in 2015.

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, fine particulate matter can be caused directly or indirectly. Some direct sources of fine particulate matter include fires and construction sites.

Indirect sources include chemicals such as nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide, which can be emitted from the burning of fossil fuels and react with other chemicals in the atmosphere to produce fine particulate matter.

Strong correlation

The researchers found a strong correlation between the production of ASOAs and volatile organic compounds, which react in the atmosphere to create fine particulate matter.
Using the models, the researchers estimate that ASOAs cause between 340,000 and 900,000 premature deaths each year. According to Dr. Nault, “[That is] more than [10] times as many deaths as previously estimated.”

While regulations on air pollution emission have increased over time, ASOAs have seen relatively little regulation.

Source www.medicalnewstoday.com

FREE webinar: IVF legislation in Greece

Are you considering IVF in Greece?
Join the IVFWEBINAR with Dr Elias Tsakos, FRCOG, Medical Director of EmbryoClinic and learn all aspects of IVF legislation in Greece.

We will be LIVE TOMORROW (Wednesday, June30th, 2021) at 7 PM (UK time), hosted by #myIVFanswers.
Register here https://www.embryoclinic.eu/webinars/

 

 

Did you miss it? You can watch the webinar here:

Embryoclinic at the 6th Panhellenic Conference on Fertility and Infertility

We are very pleased to welcome the resumption of medical conferences with a physical presence!
An optimistic message for the restoration of our daily life as we knew it and of our personal and scientific socialization!

We actively participate in the 6th Panhellenic Conference on Fertility and Infertility with a speaker, the medical director of Embryoclinic, obstetrician gynecologist, FRCOG Mr. Elias Tsako and we wish all participants and the organizing committee good luck and a good start!